Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
hiring for the holidays offset the superstorm sandy. in addition, i think -- and where i would differ from jared just a little bit and we rarely do -- the underlying economy is consideri considerably stronger. if you take into account the number of baby boomers that are retiring, that has not been talked about and does effect the labor force participation rate. the broadest measure of unemployment, the unemployed and those who left the workforce fell to 14.7%. so i think things are getting better. what i'm most afraid of is the type of talk we heard from speaker boehner and maxine waters. they are taking us to the cliff on both sides. the fact that entitlements is off the table is crazy. my friend david kotac said we should go all go to our window as was done in the movie "network" and yell out the window and say, i'm mad as hell. quit messing around with the economy. >> jared, what do you think? >> listen, if john is correct that the economy is even doing a little better than we think, all the more reason -- it kind of underscores my basic point, which is all the more reason not to b
christie met with president obama this morning to request federal aid to victims of superstorm sandy. the president is expected to ask congress for about $50 billion in emergency assistance. christie has said new jersey alone will spend almost $37 billion on rebuilding. michelle obama is competing with bill clinton for a grammy for best spoken word album. the first lady red the audio version of "american grown," the story of the white house garden. the former president narrated his book "back to work." those are a couple of things we thought you should knowment time for the news narc gut check. treasury he secretary tim geithner told cnbc yesterday that the obama administration is absolutely ready to go over the cliff if republicans refuse to raise tax rates on the wealthiest americans. take a look. >> when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy, if republicans do not agree to that is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve the rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthy. >> orrin hatch called
to address the devastating impact that super-storm sandy had a run -- had on our regional transportation, the most widely new transportation network and unprecedented damage to our system and estimates of the damage have reached more than an $7 billion. across the regent, a train tunnels, stations, railyards all flooded with critical equipment ruined and some of that equipment, unfortunately, was barely know -- fairly new. these pieces of equipment have been rendered almost useless. we seem an almost incomprehensible of damage in this picture. a boat dragged across the new jersey transit tracks. roads and bridges were damaged, left littered with debris. the holland tunnel, a major commuter route facility, carries thousands of vehicles every day in new york city-owned it was flooded. the damage to our infrastructure did not just cause structural problems but it shut down a region. for many commuters, getting to work became a much longer, hardy was, and expensive experience. you can see why, from this picture at the hoboken have station. it's hard to believe the water was 6 feet high -- at
not only because of the election, maybe firms sitting on their hands but superstorm sandy. still, guys, the number much better than expected. few tuesday, which were down right before the numbers hit, turned around. they are now higher fractionally so a big turn for stock futures and better than expected jobs number for november. i can dig in more once i get to the website. but those are your headline numbers. better than expected. >> gillian, better than expected. a lot of people blamed hurricane sandy again but that's encouraging. >> i have two economists, a liberal, who both said it was going to be somewhere between 80,000 and 100,000 jobs -- say that go sandy was worth 80 -- negatively 80,000 to 100,000. you take 146,000 and this could have been a 200-plus number. >> it's interesting because it ties in with consumer data we've been seeing which actually, you know, is not great. it's not buoyant, but it's not bad. and you look at the fact what american households have been doing recently with debt and the degree of debt they've been repaying, sort of deleveraging. you add it togethe
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)